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Teen Book Reviews — Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children


Title: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children
Author: Ransom Riggs
Stars (out of 5): 5
Review: I really liked this book. it did take a little while to get into but after i got into it i couldn’t put it down i really liked the traits the auther gave the peculiar children such as making fire in the girls hands and the girl floating on the ceiling.

This review was written by a 7th grader.

Teen Book Review — Smart Dog


Title: Smart Dog
Author: Vivian Vande Velde
Stars (out of 5): 4
Review: Smart Dog is about a dog named Sherlock who can talk. Amy finds him on her way to school and he asks her to help him. Amy agrees but only because otherwise scientists will start researching Sherlock. Amy and her two friends, Sean and Minneh start trying to keep Sherlock hidden by lying to their parents. In the end, Amy gets to keep Sherlock.

This review was written by a 7th grader.

Teen Book Review — A Room with a View


Title: A Room with a View
Author: E.M. Forster
Stars (out of 5): 4
Review: The writing in the novel is really compelling and the plot is compelling in its portrayal of fascinating characters.

This review was written by a 12th grader.

Teen Book Review — Speaking from Among the Bones


Title: Speaking from Among the Bones
Author: Alan Bradley
Stars (out of 5): 5
Review: The Flavia de Luce Mystery Series is one that is compelling and full of warmly inviting characters. The novel is both eloquent and exciting, horrifying and heartwarming. It has been a true pleasure to see the evolution of Bradley’s stellar sleuth Flavia from the very first book. It is with impatient enthusiasm that I await the next novel!

This review was written by a 12th grader.

Teen Book Review — The Death and Life of Charlie St. Cloud


Title: The Death of Life of Charlie St. Cloud
Author: Ben Sherwood
Stars (out of 5): 4
Review: The premise is so touching and interesting that I overlooked the underdeveloped relationships and characters.That being said, this book will definitely produce a tear or two against your will. You’ve been warned.

This review was written by a 12th grader.

Teen Book Review — A Free Woman on God’s Earth


Title: A Free Woman on God’s Earth
Author: Jana Laiz and Ann Elizabeth Barnes
Stars (out of 5): 4
Review: A Free Woman on God’s Earth is a biography of Elizabeth Freeman, also known as Bet or Mumbet, a former slave in Massachusetts during revolutionary times. This book is written like a story, putting all the events in her life in chronological order and writing about her emotions, making it easier to understand and enjoy than some other biographies. Elizabeth Freeman was a very important woman for history, particularly in Massachusetts. She was separated from her parents when she was only seven years old, and sent as a gift to the Ashley family, where she would stay until the end of her slavery, but not the rest of her life. She was a smart woman, and she wanted to be free from slavery, so she worked hard, and eventually found a way to free herself. During her later years as a slave, there was talk of a revolution. Elizabeth Freeman served lawyers during their meetings with Mr. Ashley, and heard their talk of freedom for America. These meetings were also where she learned that owning slaves in Massachusetts was illegal. Elizabeth Freeman, along with her friend, Brom, sued for her freedom under the Massachusetts Constitution, which stated, “All men are born free and equal.” She won the suit, and her Freedom along with it. I am going to rate this book four out of five stars. It was interesting and it caught and held my attention. However, it was an easy read, and I found it lacking some action and excitement, which was what I expected since I prefer fiction to non-fiction books. I think this story is similar to the story of Harriet Tubman. Both stories are about brave women who did amazing thinks to win their freedom from slavery, and helped others do the same. However, there is also a major difference between their stories. Elizabeth Freeman sued for her freedom, proving slavery unlawful in Massachusetts, and making it impossible to defend in court, while Harriet Tubman ran away from slavery and her way of helping was leading others to freedom. This book doesn’t compare much to my life at all, except that I sometimes wish I could make most of my own choices. However, there is a reason adults make some choices for me. It is for my own good.

This review was written by a 7th grader.

Teen Book Review — The Old Man and the Sea


Title: The Old Man and the Sea
Author: Ernest Hemingway
Stars (out of 5): 4
Review: The Old Man and the Sea is a fiction book about a Cuban fisherman. The fisherman was old, poor and had terrible luck. He hadn’t caught a good fish in months. The boy who worked with him had gone to work on a different boat, because his parents wanted him on a successful boat. But the boy cared for the old man at the end of the day, when they were done fishing. Without the boy, the old man was alone in his ship. One day, as he set off in the morning, the old man decided to go further out into the ocean than usual. Soon enough, he felt a fish tug at his line, but he couldn’t reel it in, it was too heavy. The old man waited for the fish to jump, but instead, it started swimming, dragging the old man’s boat with him. I won’t give away anymore of the story, but I think you get the point. The book is about an old fisherman’s struggle to catch a giant fish. I guess I’d rate this book 3 ½ out of 5 stars. It is very well written, and the story is interesting, but I found it a bit boring at parts. This is mostly because the author focuses a lot on details, so it tends to go on about things for a bit too long for my taste. However, I have heard that happens with a lot of old books, and this one was written a while ago. The book I find the most similar to this one would probably be The Cay. I read The Cay a while ago, so I don’t remember the details, but I do remember that there was also an old man in the story. Also, in The Cay, the characters are stranded on an island, similar to how the old man gets pulled far out into the ocean. The main thing that connects these two books, though, is that they were both pretty slow-paced, which made them a bit boring to me. I can’t say this book connects to my life in many ways. The old man was determined to catch the fish, and I can get pretty determined to do what I want to do, or get the last word in an argument sometimes. The fisherman is from Cuba, so he speaks Spanish fluently, I can’t speak it fluently, but I know a lot of Spanish, and speak it occasionally at home. If you enjoy slow-paced highly detailed books, or are interested in fishing or the sea, I would recommend reading this book.

This review was written by a 7th grader.